13 years since the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill...

Hundreds of thousands of people are likely suffering from health impacts — long-term illnesses — not only from the disaster itself, but from the millions of gallons of chemical dispersants used to “clean up” the oil spill.

Do you believe you have been chemically exposed?

We have plenty of free resources available, from free quizzes to a directory of the latest research on chemical intolerance. We also have free downloadable toolkits to help you identify toxic exposures in you and your community, and how to talk your doctor about it.

Latest News from Alert

Senator Markey calls upon EPA to address concerns about revised regulations governing the use of chemical dispersants

April 29, 2024

Massachusetts Senator Edward Markey sent a letter to the Environmental Protect Agency (EPA) urging a…

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[AP] BP defeated thousands of suits by sick Gulf spill cleanup workers. But not one by a boat captain

April 29, 2024

The Associated Press tells the story of John Maas, a boat captain, who helped use…

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[AP] Settlement to help sickened BP oil spill workers leaves most with nearly nothing

April 29, 2024

The Associated Press [AP] reports on the disappointing settlement for workers, first responders who worked…

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Sign our petition demanding that the EPA and DOI stop the use of dispersants during oil spills.
Military aircraft drops an oil-dispersing chemical into the Gulf of Mexico May 5, 2010, as part of the Deepwater Horizon Response effort. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Adrian Cadiz)
Military aircraft drops an oil-dispersing chemical into the Gulf of Mexico May 5, 2010, as part of the Deepwater Horizon Response effort. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Adrian Cadiz)

During the 2010 BP oil disaster, the federal government allowed the use of over 2 million gallons of toxic chemical dispersants to “clean up” the oil. The quantity of dispersants used during the BP oil spill was unprecedented — and so were its consequences.

We want the EPA and the DOI to stop allowing the use of the dispersants Corexit 9500A and Corexit 9527A for oil spill response in all waters of the U.S.  Science has finally confirmed that these Corexit dispersants are deadly for people and wildlife when released into the environment.

Hear from the people who lived through the disaster

Exactly 10 years since the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, ALERT hosted a series of live interviews to raise awareness about the ongoing suffering and chronic illnesses of those who lived and worked near the disaster.